DEP Provides More Thank $2 Million for Water-Quality Projects in North-Central Florida

Dec. 11, 2014

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is providing more than $2 million for water-related projects in two counties in north-central Florida. The funding will help pay to relocate a water main in Marion County, build a water reclamation facility that will positively impact Silver Springs and expand sewer service in part of Citrus County.

“Focusing our efforts on the quality and quantity of water is a wise investment,” said Interim DEP Secretary Cliff Wilson. “These projects will help reduce the amount of excess nutrients that reach our precious natural resources, which is one of DEP’s top priorities.”

“I am excited to work with Governor Scott, my colleagues in the Florida Legislature, and DEP in protecting our state’s natural resources,” Sen. Charlie Dean said. “This financial assistance will provide an invaluable and much-needed boost for these local governments and I applaud them for working to address these water-quality issues in their area. I look forward to continuing to work with local governments on projects like these which provide a direct benefit to our natural resources.”

“Addressing the issues that impact the quality of water in north-central Florida is a wise investment of our state’s resources,” Sen. Alan Hays said. “Governor Scott, the Florida Legislature and DEP have shown great leadership by committing funding to support these projects.”

The city of Belleview received $1 million to relocate a water main on Baseline Road (S.R. 35). The work, which will upgrade the existing 12-inch main to a 16-inch main, is being completed in conjunction with the Department of Transportation’s road-widening project. This project also received $431,410 in matching funds from Marion County.

The city of Ocala received $750,000 for the construction of a water reclamation facility that will provide up to 1 million gallons per day of reclaimed water to area parks, golf courses and residential subdivisions. The use of this reclaimed water will reduce the overall use of potable water for irrigation, increase water flow in Silver Springs and help reduce the amount of excess nutrients reaching Silver Springs and the Silver River. This project also received $1.85 million in matching funds from local sources.

Citrus County received $300,000 to help expand the county’s wastewater collection service to a development west and south of Crystal River. This project also received $500,000 in matching funds from local sources.

 

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