State Water Quality

Numeric Nutrient Standards
DEP is moving forward with proposed rules for numeric nutrient standards for Florida’s waterways. These rules set limits on the amount of phosphorus and nitrogen, also known as nutrients, allowed in Florida’s waters. DEP based these rules on more than a decade of research and data collection, and designed them to improve water quality, protect public health and preserve aquatic life in Florida’s waters.

View a Numeric Nutrient Standards Overview.

View a video of Drew Bartlett, DEP’s Division of Environmental Assessment and Restoration director, presenting numeric nutrient standards to the Senate Committee on Environmental Preservation and Conservation.


United States District Judge Robert L. Hinkle Ruling Allows DEP to Implement Their Own Numeric Nutrient Criteria

Judge Robert L. Hinkle ruled to discontinue federal rulemaking and allow the Department to implement their own numeric nutrient criteria, which is the most comprehensive in the nation.  This ruling marked a big milestone toward protecting and restoring water quality across Florida.


Sept. 26, 2013 Statement

The following is a statement from DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. regarding EPA action on numeric nutrient criteria on Sept. 26, 2013.

“Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approved the DEP’s numeric nutrient criteria for numerous estuaries of Florida including those in the Panhandle, Big Bend and Springs Coast. This brings to 100 percent the Florida estuaries with protective state nutrient standards in place.

“Florida has now fulfilled its obligations under the path forward agreement reached with EPA in March 2013, eliminating the need for continued dual federal and state rulemaking and securing the foundation for a Florida-led solution to nutrient pollution in the state. Not only are the state’s rules the most comprehensive standards in the nation, no other state has even come close to adopting complete nutrient standards that cover 100 percent of lakes, rivers, streams, springs, and now 100 percent of its estuaries, as Florida has.

“The Department appreciates EPA’s actions today. They mark a significant step forward in protecting and restoring water quality across Florida and serve as another example of how the environment wins when science and good public policy are chosen over costly litigation.”

Approval Letter and Decision Document

Background:

On March 15, 2013, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reached an agreement to continue to protect Florida’s waterways from nitrogen and phosphorus pollution. Fulfillment of the agreement, coupled with the previous state and federal actions summarized below, will result in Florida having numeric nutrient standards for more than 99% of its lakes, streams springs, estuaries and coastal waters.

In November 2012, EPA approved Florida’s numeric nutrient criteria for lakes, rivers, streams and springs, and the estuaries from Clearwater Harbor to Biscayne Bay, including the Florida Keys. The Department had earlier adopted these criteria, which were approved by Florida’s Environmental Regulation Commission in December 2011. Then, late last year, the ERC approved DEP’s numeric nutrient criteria for six major Panhandle estuaries: Perdido Bay, Pensacola Bay (including Escambia Bay), Choctawhatchee Bay, St. Andrew Bay, St. Joseph Bay and Apalachicola Bay.

In June 2013, the ERC approved numeric nutrient criteria for 18 estuaries along the Springs Coast, along with 448 miles of open coastal waters. These criteria cover the Loxahatchee River, Lake Worth Lagoon, Halifax River, Guana River/Tolomato River/Matanzas River, Nassau River, Suwannee River, Waccasassa River, Withlacoochee River, and Springs Coast (Crystal River to Anclote River).

State legislation called for in the path forward agreement was passed by the Legislature this session and signed into law by Governor Rick Scott in May. The legislation requires the Department to complete its nutrient criteria rulemaking for remaining estuaries and coastal waters by December 1, 2014 and sets interim nutrient standards until that time. EPA approved this numeric nutrient criteria law, which was supplemented by the Department’s August 1, 2013 report to the Governor and Florida Legislature.

Florida taxpayers have invested millions of dollars to create the nation’s most comprehensive rules controlling nutrients. These rules account for the diversity and complexity of Florida’s waters and afford local communities and private interests the tools essential to protecting rivers, lakes, estuaries, and springs for the future and restoring those waterbodies that do not currently meet standards.


June 28, 2013 Statement

The following is a statement from DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. regarding EPA action on numeric nutrient criteria on June 28, 2013.

Today, DEP’s implementation plan for Florida’s nutrient criteria were approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. EPA also filed a motion in the federal court to amend the Consent Decree to reflect its determination that further federal rulemaking is unnecessary given DEP’s rulemaking efforts.

Florida continues to fulfill the obligations reached in the path forward agreement in March to eliminate the need for continued dual rulemaking and secure the foundation for a singular, state-led solution for the state of Florida. The Department continues to set numeric nutrient criteria for virtually all waterbodies in the State furthering our position as a national leader in the adoption of these important standards.

We are gratified by the EPA’s actions today which set us on a path to having effective, comprehensive numeric limits for our state waters. This action marks a significant step forward in protecting and restoring water quality across the state.

It is important to move past the rulemaking and into implementation because that is when change occurs to address our nutrient challenge in the state. DEP, especially our dedicated staff scientists, and EPA have been working diligently to position us as the only state in nation with comprehensive criteria set for all rivers, streams, lakes, springs, estuaries, and coastal waters. I am very proud of their efforts.

This is another example of how the environment wins when the hard work of scientists at DEP and EPA — and not costly litigation — improves Florida’s water.

Background:

In March 2013, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reached an agreement to continue the protection of Florida’s waterways from excess nitrogen and phosphorus pollution. This agreement, once implemented and completed, will be coupled with EPA’s prior approval in November of the Department’s adopted water quality standards. The result will be Florida having numeric nutrient standards for lakes, streams springs, estuaries and coastal waters, and all but nearly 1 percent of these waterways in the state.

In November 2012, EPA approved Florida’s numeric nutrient criteria for lakes, rivers, streams and springs, as well as estuaries from Clearwater Harbor to Biscayne Bay and the Florida Keys.

Late last year DEP adopted numeric nutrient criteria for Panhandle estuaries.

Earlier this month, the Environmental Regulation Commission unanimously approved numeric nutrient criteria for an additional 18 estuaries and 448 miles of open coastal waters, which includes the Loxahatchee River, Lake Worth Lagoon, Halifax River, Guana River/Tolomato River/Matanzas River, Nassau River, Suwannee River, Waccasassa River, Withlacoochee River, and Springs Coast (Crystal River to Anclote River). The action means the Florida Department of Environmental Protection has set rigorous nutrient criteria for more than 3,900 of the state’s estimated 4,290 coastal miles of estuaries, or 91 percent coverage.

State legislation also required under this agreement was recently signed into law by Governor Rick Scott,  This legislation requires the Department to complete its nutrient criteria rulemaking for remaining estuaries and coastal waters by Dec. 1, 2014, and establishes interim nutrient standards for those remaining waters until then. The legislation further provides that state criteria will go into full effect when EPA withdraws all federal nutrient criteria rulemaking in Florida.

Data collection and analysis continues for the remaining nine percent of the estuaries, mostly in the Big Bend area of the state.

Florida taxpayers have invested millions of dollars to create the nation’s most comprehensive rules controlling nutrients. These rules account for the diversity and complexity of Florida’s waters and afford local communities and private interests the tools essential to cleaning up and protecting rivers, lakes, estuaries, and springs. The Department is committed to working with affected stakeholders to finish the job.

For a copy of EPA’s court filings, visit: http://www.dep.state.fl.us/secretary/news/2013/06/424main.pdf

For more information, visit http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/wqssp/nutrients.

nnc map


May 1, 2013 Statement

The following is a statement from DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. regarding the passage of numeric nutrient criteria legislation on May 1, 2013.

Today, after bi-partisan support in the House and the Senate, the numeric nutrient criteria bill (SB 1808) will now be presented to Governor Rick Scott for his signature. The legislation, combined with new state rules, form the foundation of a state-federal agreement that enables a focused, state-led solution to protecting Florida’s waters. The legislation is key to ending litigation and allowing the state to implement better protection of our waterways.

These actions will result in having numeric nutrient standards for 99 percent of Florida’s lakes, streams, springs, estuaries and coastal waters. Such standards have already been reviewed by the fantastic scientists at DEP and by EPA.

I applaud the leadership of Sen. Charlie Dean and Rep. Jake Raburn and the support of the Florida Legislature on this important issue. Florida has to address the problem of excess nutrients if we are to restore and protect the health of the rivers, lakes, springs and estuaries of this great state.

These measurable nutrient criteria will result in cleaner, safer water for all Floridians.

Background:

In March, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reached an agreement to continue the protection of Florida’s waterways from excessive levels of nitrogen and phosphorus. High levels of these pollutants cause algal blooms and are among the largest contributors to water quality problems in Florida. This agreement marks a significant step forward in protecting and restoring water quality across the state.

The agreement builds on momentum from November 2012, when EPA approved the state’s numeric nutrient criteria to cover all lakes, rivers, streams and springs, as well as estuaries from Clearwater Harbor to Biscayne Bay. The legislation and some Department rulemaking in 2013 set the stage to finish the job of setting numeric nutrient criteria for Florida’s waterways.

The plan calls for this legislation as well as adopting additional state rules that in combination will eliminate the need for continued dual rulemaking and secure the foundation for a single, state-led solution for the state of Florida. Currently, state and federal rules are in place for some Florida waterbodies.

The legislation requires the Department to complete its nutrient criteria rulemaking for remaining coastal and estuarine waters by Dec. 1, 2014, and establishes interim nutrient standards until then. The legislation further clarifies and puts into law requirements for nutrient conditions in all managed conveyances and canals, and makes it clear that all state criteria will go into effect when EPA has ceased nutrient rulemaking in Florida and removes the federal criteria.

In addition, the Department has adopted a clear implementation plan for the criteria so application of the new rules can occur immediately. The agreement with EPA, once implemented and completed, will be coupled with EPA’s prior approval in November of the Department’s adopted water quality standards. The result will be Florida having numeric nutrient standards for lakes, streams springs, estuaries and coastal waters, the vast majority of waterways in the state.


March 15, 2013 Press Release

DEP AND EPA CRAFT SOLUTION FOR SAFER, CLEANER WATER FOR FLORIDA

~ Florida’s numeric nutrient criteria will cover the vast majority of Florida waterbodies ~

TALLAHASSEE – The Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reached an agreement to continue the protection of Florida’s waterways from excess nitrogen and phosphorus pollution. These pollutants cause algal blooms and are among the largest contributors to water quality problems in Florida. This agreement marks a significant step forward in protecting and restoring water quality across the state.

The agreement builds off of momentum from November, when EPA approved the state’s numeric nutrient criteria to cover all lakes, rivers, streams and springs, as well as estuaries from Clearwater Harbor to Biscayne Bay. The Department will move forward with rulemaking and legislation in 2013 to finish the job of setting numeric nutrient criteria for Florida’s waterways.

“As a result of continued cooperation, the Department and EPA have developed a joint commitment to clean up Florida’s waterways,” said DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. “We can now move forward to implementing nutrient reduction criteria, rather than delaying environmental improvements due to endless litigation. We all should recognize the dedication of EPA and Department scientists to protecting our waterways. We appreciate their commitment to a sound, long term plan to protect Florida waters.”

The plan includes proposing state legislation and adopting additional state rules that, when combined, will eliminate the need for continued dual rulemaking and secure the foundation for a singular, state-led solution for the state of Florida. Currently, state and federal rules are in place for some Florida waterbodies.

The proposed legislation would require the Department to complete its nutrient criteria rulemaking for remaining coastal and estuarine waters by Dec. 1, 2014, and establish interim nutrient standards until then. The legislation would further codify requirements for nutrient conditions in all managed conveyances and canals, and makes it clear that all state criteria will go into effect when EPA removes the federal criteria and ceases future rulemaking.

“Clean water is vital to Florida’s future. The health and growth of Florida’s economy, and the jobs that go with it, depend on high quality and sustainable sources of water,” said Sen. Charlie Dean. “We expect this legislation to be part a strong, effective framework for protecting and restoring waters which are vital to the economic and environmental health of Florida. Secretary Vinyard’s leadership is instrumental in getting the water right.”

“There is not a bigger challenge or more important issue to address than nutrients, if we are to restore and protect the health of our rivers, lakes, springs and estuaries,” said Rep. Matt Caldwell. “Measurable nutrient criteria will result in cleaner, safer water for all Floridians.”

In addition, the Department has adopted a clear implementation plan for the criteria so application of the new rules can occur immediately. This agreement, once implemented and completed, will be coupled with EPA’s prior approval in November of the Department’s adopted water quality standards. The result will be Florida having numeric nutrient standards for lakes, streams springs, estuaries and coastal waters, and all but nearly 1 percent of these waterways in the state.

Supplemental Information:

NNC Agreement

Path Forward Document

Implementation Plan

Proposed Legislation

Florida Numeric Nutrient Criteria Coverage Map

Numeric Nutrient Criteria State-by-State


Feb. 25, 2013 Statement

The following is a statement from the DEP regarding appellate court ruling on Florida’s numeric nutrient criteria on Feb. 25, 2013.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is pleased with today’s decision by the First District Court of Appeal, which affirms Administrative Law Judge Bram D. E. Canter’s Final Order upholding DEP’s numeric nutrient criteria rules. 

Today’s ruling was in response to an appeal of the June 2012 order by Judge Canter which upheld DEP’s rules in their entirety. The petitioners had challenged whether DEP’s existing and proposed nutrient rules were scientifically supported. The District Court of Appeal per curiam affirmed Judge Canter’s order. The appellate court’s affirmation follows the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s decision in November to approve Florida’s numeric nutrient criteria.

These peer-reviewed rules have received the full support of the Florida Legislature, members of the Cabinet, and the EPA, and now have withstood two rounds of judicial scrutiny. Due to the efforts of staff at the Department, and the support of Florida residents, the State of Florida has more numeric nutrient criteria set for our waterways than any other State in the nation.

These rules set limits on the amount of phosphorus and nitrogen, also known as nutrients, allowed in Florida’s waters. DEP based these rules on more than a decade of research and data collection, and designed them to improve water quality, protect public health and preserve aquatic life in Florida’s waters.

No other state in the nation has even come close to adopting complete nutrient standards that cover 100 percent of lakes, rivers, streams, springs, and now 72 percent of its estuaries, as Florida has.

To view today’s ruling, visit: http://www.dep.state.fl.us/secretary/files/per_curiam_affirmed.pdf

To view the Florida Division of Administrative Hearing cases (case nos.11-6137 and 12-157), visit http://www.doah.state.fl.us/ALJ/


Nov. 30, 2012 Statement

The following is a statement from DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. regarding  EPA’s decision on state’s numeric nutrient criteria on Nov. 30, 2012.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is pleased with today’s decision by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approving the State’s numeric nutrient criteria. The result will be cleaner water.

EPA’s decision confirms the efforts of hard working scientists at DEP. EPA’s decision is also supported by Judge Canter who, after fully reviewing the science and criteria, upheld DEP’s rules entirely.

DEP and EPA are working diligently to complete the job statewide, returning the focus to restoration rather than litigation.

While EPA has approved the State’s criteria, we are disappointed about EPA’s decision to issue new proposed federal rules.  We will work with them to craft solutions that will allow the State to assume all nutrient criteria rulemaking in Florida.

Florida knows its waters best and we remain committed on the path to a state-lead solution, which is the best answer for Florida.


 Nov. 13, 2012 Press Release

ERC APPROVES NUMERIC NUTRIENT CRITERIA FOR FLORIDA’S SIX MAJOR PANHANDLE ESTUARIES

~Rigorous standards now in place for more than 72 percent of the state’s estuaries~

TALLAHASSEE– The Environmental Regulation Commission on Tuesday unanimously approved numeric nutrient criteria for Florida’s six major Panhandle estuaries, further building on the already comprehensive nutrient standards set for Florida late last year. The action means the Florida Department of Environmental Protection has set rigorous nutrient criteria for more than 3,100 of the state’s estimated 4,290 coastal miles of estuaries, or 72 percent coverage. Data collection and analysis continues for the remainder of the estuaries.

“Floridians depend on healthy water resources for their livelihoods and everyday enjoyment. We have demonstrated once again, through cutting-edge science and aggressive action, that the Department meets its responsibilities to protect those resources ahead of its own and EPA’s schedules,” said Drew Bartlett, Director of the Department’s Division of Environmental Assessment and Restoration. “We are gratified by the ERC’s action.”

These are the numeric nutrient standards for the Panhandle estuaries, which includes Perdido Bay, Pensacola Bay (including Escambia Bay), Choctawhatchee Bay, St. Andrew Bay, St. Joseph Bay and Apalachicola Bay. The nutrient water quality standards adopted in 2011 included a schedule for the development of estuary specific numeric nutrient criteria for the Panhandle estuaries by June 30, 2013, and the Department has developed nutrient standards for total phosphorus, total nitrogen and chlorophyll a for individual estuary segments in each of the estuaries.

The numeric nutrient standards come nearly seven months before the Department’s own deadline and 10 months before The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s schedule for setting standards. And they come five months after the Department’s overall numeric nutrient standards set last year were upheld by an Administrative Law judge in their entirety and submitted to EPA for review.  EPA confirmed last year that the Department’s rules are accurate and will serve to protect and improve Florida’s water quality.

Florida taxpayers have invested millions of dollars to create the nation’s most comprehensive rules, which account for the diversity and complexity of Florida’s waters and the challenge that nutrient pollution represents. These rules afford local communities and private interests the tools essential to cleaning up and protecting rivers, lakes and estuaries. The Department is committed to working with affected stakeholders to finish the job.

For more information visit http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/wqssp/nutrients.


June 7, 2012 Statement

The following is a statement from DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. regarding  outcome of the Administrative Hearing for Numeric Nutrient Standards  on June 7, 2012.

“Today’s ruling by Administrative Law Judge Bram D. E. Canter upholds DEP’s numeric nutrient standard rules, further supporting and validating that Florida is taking the right steps to get our state’s water right. These rules have been peer reviewed and have received not only the full support of the legislature and members of the Cabinet, but of the court, as well.

“The state of Florida is, and has historically been, a national leader in assessing and addressing the health of our waterways. Florida has spent years studying our waterbodies, and no one knows our water better than us. DEP scientists and other hard-working professionals have dedicated their lives to protecting the environment and understanding the complexity of Florida’s unique waterbodies. Florida has made a significant investment, spanning more than a decade, studying and collecting data regarding nutrients in Florida’s unique aquatic ecosystems.  We have used this science to develop a set of rules for the state of Florida that are the most comprehensive nutrient standards in the nation.  

“We have crafted not only standards, but also the rules detailing implementation of the standards. Our rules provide a clear process for identifying waters impaired by nutrients, preventing harmful discharges and establishing necessary reductions. They provide a reasonable and predictable implementation strategy and avoid unnecessary costs on Florida’s households and businesses. DEP has invested millions of dollars to generate nutrient rules for Florida’s waters and has now received a full endorsement from the judge confirming that DEP’s rules will protect our waterways at an affordable price.

“Our rules have been submitted to EPA for their final review and approval. EPA scientists have already confirmed that DEP’s rules are accurate, correct and will continue to improve our state’s water quality.  With today’s pronouncement by the court that Floridians and DEP are on the right track to getting the water right, we look forward to getting them on the books as soon as possible. It’s time to turn our focus on improving water quality, put our plan into action and end needless litigation that delays Florida’s rules.”

View Ruling.

Letter from EPA from members of Florida’s congressional delegation.

 Letter to EPA from Senator Bill Nelson.


Feb. 16, 2012 Statement

The following is a statement from DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. regarding Florida’s numeric nutrient standards to get Florida’s water right on Feb. 16, 2012, awaiting final approval from EPA.

“Governor Rick Scott signed legislation today that supports Florida moving forward with setting numeric nutrient standards for our waterbodies, by presenting our rules for to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for final approval. A healthy environment depends on getting Florida’s water right, in terms of both water supply and water quality. No one knows Florida’s water better than Floridians, and these rules will allow us to effectively protect water quality in our state.

“Our rules provide a clear process for identifying waters impaired by nutrients, preventing harmful discharges and establishing necessary reductions. They provide a reasonable and predictable implementation strategy, and avoid unnecessary costs for Florida’s households and businesses.

“We are pleased that we will now be able to submit our widely supported rules for final EPA approval. It’s important to start addressing our nutrient challenges, and we look forward to getting these rules on the books and implemented as soon as possible.” 


Dec. 8, 2011 Statement

Before the proposed rules are presented to the Legislature for ratification in early 2012, DEP first had to present the rules to the Environmental Regulation Commission for adoption. The following is a statement from DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. regarding the ERC vote on Dec. 8, 2011, to adopt the rules.

“The Environmental Regulation Commission unanimously approved amended rules for numeric nutrient standards for Florida, which will serve to protect our rivers, lakes, streams, springs and estuaries.The future of Florida’s environment depends on the health of our water resources, and no one knows our waters better than us. This is the right thing for Florida, and the right thing to do.

“We are pleased with the outcome of today’s vote, and look forward to working with the Florida Legislature to advance the most comprehensive nutrient pollution limitations in the nation.

“Florida has invested millions of dollars to create nutrient rules that address the complexity of Florida’s waters, and we remain committed to finishing the job.”


Dec. 1, 2011 Statment

On Dec. 1, 2011, EarthJustice, a non-profit environmental law firm, filed a legal challenge claiming DEP is weakening pollution limits. The following is DEP’s statement in response to the legal challenge.

“The Florida Department of Environmental Protection remains confident that adopting our nutrient rules is the right thing for Florida.Protecting Florida’s water resources is a top priority of the Department, and we lead the nation in knowledge, research and action related to nutrient standards. As such, Florida is best positioned to develop these rules. The EPA, local governments, citizens and organizations statewide, support us moving forward with our rules.Public input, including legal challenges, are an important part of our rulemaking process. However, it is action that will ultimately protect and restore our waterbodies.”


Nov. 2, 2011 Statement

On Nov. 2, 2011, DEP submitted the proposed rules and meeting notice to the Florida Administrative Weekly. The following is a statement on this submittal from DEP Secretary Vinyard.

“I authorized staff to move forward with rulemaking for numeric nutrient standards for Florida. The future of Florida’s environment depends on the health of our water resources, and no one knows our waters better than us. This is the right thing for Florida, and the right thing to do.If adopted, these rules will be the most comprehensive nutrient pollution limitations in the nation, and will serve to protect our rivers, lakes, streams, springs and estuaries.Using more than a decade of data collection and analysis, Florida has developed standards that account for the individual characteristics and needs of Florida’s diverse water resources. By setting standards focused on site-specific conditions we are better able to protect public health, improve water quality and preserve aquatic life in Florida’s unique water resources throughout the state.

“Florida’s efforts go beyond crafting scientifically-sound standards for our waterbodies. We also provide a reasonable and predictable strategy to implement these standards, allowing us to direct our resources to where they will have the most meaningful benefit to our environment and reduce the financial burdens on Florida’s homeowners and businesses.

“The state of Florida is, and has historically been, a national leader assessing and addressing the health of our waterways. Florida accounts for 30 percent of the national water quality dataset, far surpassing any other state in the nation. These rules are the result of years of work not only by DEP, but by Florida’s stakeholders, including environmental groups, governments, water management districts, business and agricultural interests.

“We’ve worked closely with the EPA throughout the rule development process, and appreciate their cooperation and feedback.

“Florida has invested millions of dollars to create nutrient rules that address the complexity of Florida’s waters, and we intend to finish the job.”


Myth vs. Reality – a helpful guide to Florida’s Numeric Nutrient Standards 

Nutrients are natural substances that our ecosystems need in order to be healthy. They are very different from toxic pollutants, but can become a problem when they occur in excess of what naturally occurs in an aquatic system. Nutrients have a very complex relationship with the natural environment, which is based in large part on the type of aquatic system in which they are found. What may be healthy or unhealthy for one waterbody may not be for another.

   Myth                                                                    Reality

DEP’s numeric standards are less protective than those outlined in the federal rule. Not true. Numerically, DEP’s rules are practically identical to EPA’s.  In fact, EPA’s rule was based on its interpretations of DEP data and analysis. The real difference, however, is how the rules will be implemented.  DEP’s rules allow for real-world verification of biological impacts and provide a reasonable and predictable implementation strategy.  It also incorporates a trend test to measure nutrients over time so that DEP can identify potential problems before they occur.  None of these measures were included in the federal rule.

See more Myth Versus Reality …


In the news

DEP’s Division of Environmental Assessment and Restoration Director Drew Bartlett responds to articles regarding the proposed rules.


More information

One Response to “State Water Quality”

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